Жом Бача Бәрита! Let’s Read the News – In the Malay Cyrillic Alphabet!

Жом Бача Бәрита! Let’s Read the News – In the Malay Cyrillic Alphabet!

Last year, I went around the Internet looking for any suitable reading materials for me to help people learn the Malay Cyrillic alphabet.

Since I was the first person ever on the face of the earth to create such an alphabet (a daring claim, I know, but I’m convinced), currently there are zero Malay reading material and literature written in Cyrillic. Nobody could find anything written in Malay that is written in this Cyrillic alphabet other than that found in this website.

I want to change this. I want to make it more accessible for people to learn and practice Cyrillic for Malay and my long-term goal is to have a growing number of people committed in using the script for everyday use alongside Latin (the official script) and Jawi Arabic (the liturgical/religious script).

I translated whole news articles from Rumi Latin to Cyrillic. I did the whole process manually without any automatic softwares to change the letters. Obviously it took quite some time to publish and prepare, but the end result is satisfying to say the least.
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Yes? Да? Так? Make up your mind! (UPDATED)



Learning languages can be a wonderful experience, especially when you realise how similar some words are with regards to their sounds. These words are often called ‘false friends‘, and using them out of the context of the language could land you in a mind-numbing situation.

Malay is my native language, but I realised there are a few simple words in Malay that are very similar to Russian, Ukrainian and Belarusian words. I imagined that maybe if a Malay-speaker speaking an East Slavic language for the first time, he or she might get these mixed up with these words.

Here I use primarily the Malay Cyrillic alphabet to transcribe the Malay language examples instead of the regular conventional Latin alphabet official in Malaysia. To find out how to read it and revert it back to Latin I suggest reading the whole series about the Malay Cyrillic alphabet.

Addendum: Due to hindsight, I decided to add one more word here, but be warned that in Russian, it is a swear word. If you will be offended by this, please skip reading the last subsection of the post for the last word. The word in English is censored, but the word in Russian isn’t.
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Malay Language in Cyrillic Script (Абжад Сирил Мәлаю) – Part 4 – Official Names of the Letters

All letters must have their own names

 
At least, that’s what all letters need in any alphabet, and the Malay Cyrillic alphabet is no exception.
 
The names of the letters of the alphabet are generally the same as Russian, with a few differences. Below is a table of all the names of each letter in Malay (Cyrillic and Latin), Russian and its IPA pronunciation guide for the Malay names.
I included the hard and soft sign at the end of the table despite it not being a part of the official Malay Cyrillic alphabet. This is just so that they could be referred to when used in the Alternative Orthography.

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Malay Language in Cyrillic Script (Абжад Сирил Мәлаю) – Part 3 – Computer Input

Добрый день and good day to everyone! 

In the beginning of this year I introduced the Malay Cyrillic alphabet to the world but I did not leave any indication of how to use it in everyday life. One of the most ubiquitous ways we handle our daily routine is by using modern computer devices for work, entertainment and studies. In this post I will bring to light the compatibility issues and ways to use the Malay Cyrillic alphabet seamlessly on your PC.
 

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Malay Language in Cyrillic Script (Абжад Сирил Мәлаю) – Part 2 – Further Explanation

Ассаламу’алаикум дан салам сәжахтәра!

It’s been a while since I posted my guide to the Malay Cyrillic alphabet, but I realised that I missed out on some very important points which I will clarify in this second section.

The Glottal Stop and the Apostrophe

In the Malay language, the glottal stop is a frequently occurring sound, especially in the middle of words such as ‘maaf’ and also at the end of words ending with ‘k’, like ‘banyak’.

Normally in the middle of the word glottal stops are not represented by any letter in the Latin Rumi alphabet. This often happens when it happens in between the vowel letters a, i, u, e and o, especially when prefixes and suffixes are added to a verb or adjective to change the nature to a noun or another form of verb.
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